WE’RE HERE II: Black Creators of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror in Film & Fiction

Chronicles of Harriet

In my last post, I provided a listing of popular fandom events with a major Black presence.

I now offer you We’re Here, part II.

Coincidentally (?),  friend and fellow speculative fiction author, SR Torris, asked me, shortly after I scheduled this article to post, to check out a video in which the narrator launched a scathing attack on Black writers for our “lack of a literary capacity or intellectual competence to write such stories [Science Fiction and Fantasy]” and “Because most Black writers have no knowledge of anything other than pimping hoes and hearing women complain about not being able to find a man.”

As I have said before, I do not believe in coincidence; I know this post is right on time and much needed.

The lack of knowledge of the existence of great Black writers of speculative fiction by the narrator of that…

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7 Magpies

Black Cinema Connection

Seven Magpies

Status:  Announced
Release Date: TBA
Genre:  Horror/Anthology
Rating:  Unknown
Studio(s):  Cruell World Productions
Director(s): Lucy Cruell, Tiffany D. Jackson, Nicole Renee, Robin Shanea, Lary Love Dolley, Meosha Bean, and Rae Dawn Chong.
Writer(s):  Tananarive Due, Sumiko Saulson, Eden Royce, Crystal Connor, Valjeanne Jeffers, Linda D Addison, Paula Ashe.
Cast:  TBA

Details:  The First All African-American Female Written & Directed Horror Anthology.

According to Joblo, 7 Magpies will be made up of seven “haunting, unforgettable supernatural horror shorts”, each written by an African-American female, each brought to the screen by an African-American female director. Created by L.C. Cruell in reaction to the fact that no African-American female directors have been asked to contribute to any of the recent horror anthologies and inspired by the nursery rhyme “One for Sorrow”, 7 Magpies has the following description:

Ancient superstitions in many cultures have considered magpies to be a bird of…

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Charleston (a poem)

Tananarive Due Writes

Charleston

June 18, 2015

 

–For John Due and Patricia Stephens Due

And the 9 Homegoers at Emanuel AME Church

Candles - 9

Because I was hurting and knew he was too,

I spoke to my 80-year-old father today—

The man who served beside my late mother in

America’s undeclared war on Her Own,

Whose heart sped in Florida and Mississippi,

Whose daily waking world is retold in my history books–

And he was too busy to talk,

On his way to a meeting,

Going about his business,

Because he knows Freedom is a journey,

Never a destination,

And because the Movement toward liberation

Is what keeps his heart Alive.

© 2015 by Tananarive Due

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The Steamfunk Canon!

Chronicles of Harriet

A while ago, I wrote The Dieselfunk Canon, providing a list of books considered the definitive works in Dieselfunk.

Since Dieselfunk is the literary sibling of Steamfunk – and since this is the year Steamfunk comes back at you like gangbusters with the release of three novels – I figured it is now time to provide you with the Steamfunk Canon.

Here, you will not find Steampunk books that simply have a Black protagonist. No, these are books written by authors who proudly identify their work as Steamfunk and who skillfully deliver Funktastic stories in the genre.

Alright, Steamfunkateers…here goes:

Moses: The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman (Books 1 and 2) by Balogun Ojetade

harriet tubman“I’m gon’ drive the evil out and send it back to Hell, where it belong!” – Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman: Freedom fighter. Psychic. Soldier. Spy. Something…more. Much more.

In MOSES: The Chronicles of Harriet…

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